in Apple, Books, Design, Technology

Learning to Love Photo Management

I was listening to The Prompt episode 15 and during their corespondent report they had Bradley Chambers on to school Myke Hurley on how he could be managing his 7GB iPhone photo library better.

In Myke’s defence, photo management has only gotten more difficult with iPhones, iPads – not easier. It’s certainly easier to take great pictures than it’s every been before thanks to the amazing camera software/hardware combination in iOS devices, particularly the iPhone 5S, but maintaing the photo library from device to computer to cloud is getting increasingly frustrating – especially when you add in a spouse 1 or family members who also take photos with their own devices.

Which is why Chambers wrote Learning to Love Photo Management – a digital book he currently sells for $2.99 in PDF format or iBooks version:

Oddly enough, this book shouldn’t need to exist. Our devices should just handle all of this for us. They don’t, though. Our only option is to try to build the simplest solution we can in the mean time. This book is about how I have taken control of my importing, backup, organizing, and enjoying of all my digital photos. Use this book as a template or as a spring board to develop your own methods.

After listening to Chambers’ explanation on The Prompt, I picked up a copy of his book and plan to spend some time this weekend setting up my iPhone 4 and my wife’s iPad mini with our Macs on Dropbox and Everpix – the latter is the photo service Apple should just buy and replace iCloud with.

Learning to Love Photo Management is well written, easy to read and looks great in the PDF format I chose to buy it in. I’m sure it looks just as great, if not better, on the iPad.

My only criticism is that he doesn’t touch on photo editing/adjustments. But I’d guess most people do very little of that on their iOS devices aside from if they share it on Instagram with a filter.

Screenshots from Learning to Love Photo Management


  1. To be clear: it’s not the spouse themselves that are frustrating.