in Apple, iOS Apps, Video Gaming

Minecraft for Apple TV

I tweeted a question earlier today that’s been rumbling around in my brain1:

https://twitter.com/iChris/status/641311009823674369

On Wednesday, September 9th 2015 Apple is reportedly presenting their new vision for what the Apple TV hardware and software will be. As usual, rumours are swirling about what apps will be available – Twitter is rumoured to be working on a version of Periscope for the new Apple TV – but what I was drawn to immediately was the games that would work with the new remote they’re allegedly building for it.

Games are fairly universal. Features like “NFL Football” and “HBO Go” for Apple TV in the past are tied to licensing contracts primary based in the USA. But games 2 don’t have that problem. A popular game on the App Store can be available around the world within days – not years like music and TV based apps.

Never Dig Down

The most profitable iOS game based on my random viewings of the top paid apps 3 over the last year or so has got to be Pocket Minecraft. It’s $7.99 and rarely goes on sale but is consistently in the top 5-10 apps on the paid chart.

Screenshot 2015-09-08 14.53.50

So if Apple is hoping to bring developers over to their new Apple TV platform, you’d think Mojang (developers of Minecraft) would be on the top of their list.

Except that Microsoft bought Minecraft last year.

So I’m guessing we won’t see Minecraft for Apple TV on stage tomorrow, nor launch day of the new Apple TV. But I’m sure that Microsoft won’t want to turn down potential revenue to pay back their Minecraft purchase, nor will it likely be all that much work for developers to deploy to the Apple TV since it’ll likely be structured a lot like the existing iPhone and iPad platforms for developers.

So Minecraft for Apple TV will come but it’ll come later. For now, keep crafting on your iPhone, iPad, PC or Mac, or Android tablet.

Screenshots of Pocket Minecraft for iOS


  1. I haven’t read any articles about this from Mojang or Microsoft so forgive me if I’m out of the loop on this.

  2. …as well as apps in general but for the purpose of this article, I’m just talking games.

  3. top free apps are a different category. Free often have in-app purchase so it’s a different kind of market.

  1. To answer your alternate universe question, I think they almost definitely would be. I’m pretty sure Minecraft could still be considered a “system seller” despite the fact that it’s like 5 years old now (which is insane – nice job Mojang!)

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